Saturday, March 10, 2007

Reply by August (Part II)

However, there should always be a significant improvement in reduction of symptoms if one uses natural remedies in combination.
For instance, taking a homeopathic remedy called Sulphur in 1M or 10M potency will reduce not only symptoms of stuttering, but many anxiety symptoms as well in many people who have these problems. However, it is not clear how each person responds to the remedy. Therefore, it is best to combine using it with hypnosis, flower essences and energy medicine. The program explains in detail. What makes one an expert? Having lived through this does.
Lastly, a few comments have to be made about you wanting to become a lawyer. Since you have been insulting to us, we do have a right to be insulting to you.
To be a lawyer, you need to be able to think analytically. You simply do not have this ability. When you graduate from law school, you are probably going to be heavy in debt. You will not get hired anywhere as a lawyer unless you will be able to speak fluently. Even then, the competition among your fluent peers for any law job will be fierce!

What are your replies to the comment? I will post mine on Monday.

14 comments:

OliverTwix said...

I just wanted to answer to "August" that the reply you write is not an argument.
Hypnosis and homeopathy are medieval methods. Can you say how many stutterers had already noticed an improvement with your methods ?

Olivier, France

Einar said...

The thing about "alternative" medicine is that there is no objective dialogue possible concerning that stuff. The believers of it think it works (a bit like with religion) and no empirical evidence proving the contrary is ever going to convince those people. I think if someone is willing to waste time and money in that sense it's his own fault.
I find it outrageous that some people manage to make money with other peoples ignorance, sad but true...

Law Student said...

I have no big problem with alternative medicines...in fact, I know people who have taken homeopathic "medicines" to address digestion issues such as candida, etc. However, there is an entire industry out there that does its best to substantiate the use of such herbal remedies. And most of them are careful to comply with FDA guidelines...to refrain from making curative claims of diseases.

To offer a "program" without giving any details about it or any sort of substantiation addressing its effectiveness...and then charging customers for this "program"...in my opinion, amounts to unethical business practices and very much appears to meander into the realm of fraud and swindle.

Ora said...

august wrote:

"All natural remedies have curative powers."

"Particularly, the need for them diminishes with time."

Huh????

Anonymous said...

Huh???, is right. August's post was one of the most disjointed writing samples I have ever seen. August/Mark/Vlad states one must "speak fluently" to be hired as a lawyer. Well more importantly, one must write clearly and concisely to be hired and work as a lawyer. I guess now we know why he is not making it as a lawyer and needs to supplement his income with these websites.

Law Student said...

It's also interesting to note that, as a lawyer, he seems to be completely ignorant of United States FDA guidelines with regard to selling health supplements and making "claims". I personally know of two companies in southern California that were shut down by the FDA because they would not comply with the FDA guidelines.

It was amusing to see how quickly he removed the word "cure" from his website after he got wind of this discussion.

Tom Weidig said...

Wow. So he removed the word "cure" from the website?? :-)

Law Student said...

Yeah, after I stupidly emailed him...it was gone in like 10 minutes. I haven't checked recently...maybe it's back. :)

Tom Weidig said...

Yes, emailing him wasnt the brighest moment in your life... lol

Adrian said...

Tom, I have loved your three crackpots so far. They have deserved everything they got. But what about some of the more mainstream therapies that have been misleading stutterers for years. We have all seen the internet advertisements for Hollins or Martin Schwartz boasting their 93% or 94% success rates. Perhaps these therapies do help some, but we all know the success rates are misleading at best and bogus at worst. Shouldn't these programs be considered for the crackpot awards too?

P.S. Sorry to stray slightly from the current discussion, but I didn't know where else to post this.

Anonymous said...

This comment is aimed at Law Student and Anonymous. Listen, I have a stutter and have been working as an attorney with more than a moderate level of success for 13 years now. It can and will be done in both of your cases. Just be careful what you wish for, this profession is becoming a business.

Greg Kenyon
Dayton, Ohio

Law Student said...

As the former dir. of corp. communications at a company that manufactured health supplements, it was my job, partly, to oversee online advertising of our products...and emailing the advertiser was the first step we took before going through the legal department. I was just going back into that mode. *laugh* I couldn't help myself.

Law Student said...

Thanks, Greg, for that input. I have no doubt that I will be a decent attorney and my stutter hasn't impeded my law study or any public speaking part of the education. And congrats to you, as well!

Anonymous said...

'Objective dialogue?' Like you're indulging in? LOL.
Homeopathy is 'medieval'? Saves you time having to objectively investigate it I guess. Or you can send a joker like the Amazing Randi to do his patented prejudicial hatchet job. I suggest you find a professional homeopath, try his or her recommendations, then objectively report on your findings.
You scientilists are funny. BTW, homeopathy cured my asthma, but I guess you'll convince yourself I merely hypnotised myself.